Schedule or Join an Adventure

Planning a trip to Alaska? Let Alaska Dream Adventures help you create the perfect kayaking/canoeing adventure! Let us know when and where you'd like to go, and we'll work with you to make it happen. If you don't want to plan your own trip, then come along on one of our pre-scheduled adventures.

Trip scheduling is dependent upon interest and requests. Prices include food and equipment rental. Discounts are available for students, military, and youth groups and organizations. We prefer group sizes ranging between four and twelve people to maintain the wilderness experience. If you purchase a kayak from us, you get a 25% off certificate for your next trip!

Email us to book your trip slot. Participant number is limited to keep the wilderness experience.

 2018 schedule is: 

Trip Difficulty ratings are at the bottom of the page.

 
Date Trip Cost/paddler Description
       
May 18-19 Delta Clearwater $225

The Delta Clearwater is a gentle class I trip on a scenic section of river near Delta Junction. More information will be added

 

May 23 Paddle and Play series begins  

REI, Alaska Dream Adventures, and Epic Kayak Ultimate join together to present a series of kayak skills classes and game skills development sessions. These sessions are designed to help novice paddlers gain confidence and helpful paddling skills to promote safer paddling habits. In addition the game Epic Kayak Ultimate is taught as a great way to practice those skills and to engage paddling in a fun group environment.

 

May 25-26 Upper Chatanika $225

The Chatanika River, a Class II river, is a part of the Yukon River drainage and is a clear or lightly tannic stained rapid-runoff stream. It has its headwaters in the mountains of the northeastern portion of the Alaska Range and flows westward through valleys between summits and uplands for about four-fifths of its length before it enters Minto Flats, eventually joining the Tolovana River. It is most suited to small craft such as canoes or kayaks.                                                                                                                

Mile 66 to Mile 30: 30 miles This upper section of river is quite shallow with numerous sweepers and the occasional log jam that blocks the entire river. The river meanders in a way that does not allow good visibility of what is downstream; so pay attention for logjams. At mile 39 is the Upper Chatanika River State Recreation Site.

 

June 1-3 Upper Chena River $300

The Upper Chena can be accessed from a variet of bridge locations near Chena Hot Springs along Chena Hot Springs Road. This river is the result of snow melt, springs, and drainage from the hills around the southern reaches of The White Mountains and the various hills east of Fairbanks. The Upper Chena River is a true gem located fairly close to civilization, but you often wouldn't know it. The scenery is spectacular and you tend to remain out of sight of any structures except for the occasional bridge as the river winds along the valley. The fishing is rather active but salmon fishing is restricted as these are prime spawning grounds. Fall trips often have spectacular salmon viewing opportunities.

 

June 8-10 Gulkana $400

The Gulkana trip begins at Paxson Lake. There's a three-mile paddle through the lake before you get into the river, which maintains a fairly swift pace once you get into it. The Gulkana sees a fairly high usage by rafters, who find its class III whitewaters to be some of the more exciting in the Interior. Due to the high number of users, it is likely you will encounter other paddlers, although Alaskan paddlers tend to be very polite and friendly. Paxson Lake is known for its lake trout. The river is known for its salmon, but it also has grayling, Dolly Varden, and rainbow trout. The further down you get on the Gulkana, the more likely it is you'll see some Steelhead trout as well. The Gulkana trip has amazing scenery, a salmon counting station, and awesome rock formations as we travel through volcanic mountain ranges

 

June 15-17 Tangle Lakes $350

Tangle Lakes is the headwaters for the Delta River. The lower and upper lakes are connected by the Tangle River. This is a truly amazing 35-mile trip that takes you into the heart of the calm-but-wild Alaskan environment. There are few visitors here except for the plethora of wildlife. Tangle Lakes offers amazing fishing. The most common fish caught here are Arctic Grayling, but there is good Lake Trout fishing early in the season (and sometimes later). The Grayling fishery has been listed in several places as the greatest in the world. For best access to the Grayling, it is usually best to take the rapids (portaging around the falls) and find the remote river areas that are much less frequented. The portage is two fairly challenging quarter-mile sections separated by a beaver pond, so when packing, remember that all gear will be carried half a mile. The rapids after the portage are Class II to II .

 

June 23-25 Rock Creek $100/day and $100 Transportation if desired

Rock Creek is a class II whitewater creek flowing into the upper Tangle Lakes area. This is a creeking day that can include several runs down this 3 mile rough and tumble section of creek. This trip is all about the whitewater and play. Add $100 for transportation to and from the creek if you don't want to just meet us there. You must have some kayak skill to participate in this adventure. This is a good introduction to the world of whitewater creeking.

 

June 21-24 Level 2 Essentials of River Canoeing course in conjunction with Tangle Lakes (prerequisite Level 1 course) $500

Course Overview: The Essentials of River Canoeing course is designed as an introduction to paddling rivers. Participants learn to catch large eddies and perform simple peel outs and ferries, recognize and avoid hazards, perform rescues and respond to emergencies on moving water rivers. This course is appropriate for all types of tandem and/or solo canoes. It can be taught tandem, solo, or both.                                                                         Tangle Lakes is the headwaters for the Delta River. The lower and upper lakes are connected by the Tangle River. This is a truly amazing 35-mile trip that takes you into the heart of the calm-but-wild Alaskan environment. There are few visitors here except for the plethora of wildlife. Tangle Lakes offers amazing fishing. The most common fish caught here are Arctic Grayling, but there is good Lake Trout fishing early in the season (and sometimes later). The Grayling fishery has been listed in several places as the greatest in the world. For best access to the Grayling, it is usually best to take the rapids (portaging around the falls) and find the remote river areas that are much less frequented. The portage is two fairly challenging quarter-mile sections separated by a beaver pond, so when packing, remember that all gear will be carried half a mile. The rapids after the portage are Class II to II .

 

June 29-July 5 Birch Creek $500

Just north of Fairbanks, Alaska, flowing out of the low mountains and rolling hills west of Chena Dome and south of Mastodon Dome, is the Birch Creek National Wild and Scenic River, one of only a few rivers of this status that is accessible by road and requires no flying in or out to do the 126-mile section of Class I to III river. A swift, shallow stream, Birch Creek begins above its confluence with Twelvemile Creek and for the first 10 miles is a narrow, winding and shallow, stream that requires dragging over riffles at times. It is more suited to canoes and kayaks but small rafts can easily make the trip. The river winds and twists its way through the forested hills before spilling out into the Yukon Flats country with the last 30 miles low relief, muskeg country. It is a lovely trip with enough challenge to keep things interesting. There are up to four Class III rapids in the stretch between Clum's Fork and Thomas Creek and if the river is high they could be Class IV.

 

July 6-8 Rock Creek creeking $100/day and $100 Transportation if desired

Rock Creek is a class II whitewater creek flowing into the upper Tangle Lakes area. This is a creeking day that can include several runs down this 3 mile rough and tumble section of creek. This trip is all about the whitewater and play. Add $100 for transportation to and from the creek if you don't want to just meet us there. You must have some kayak skill to participate in this adventure. This is a good introduction to the world of whitewater creeking.

 

July 14-15 Jim River $350

In the Alaskan wilderness north of the arctic circle, paralleling sections of the Haul Road (the Dalton Highway), in the foothills of the Brooks Range, can be found the Jim River. It's north of the Arctic Circle, so there are different types of vegetation than in most other rivers we run. Not an exceptionally challenging river, this one is unique primarily due to its location (north of the Arctic Circle). It's a good place for viewing moose, caribou, eagles, bears, and salmon.

 

July 20-22 Tangle Lakes $350

Tangle Lakes is the headwaters for the Delta River. The lower and upper lakes are connected by the Tangle River. This is a truly amazing 35-mile trip that takes you into the heart of the calm-but-wild Alaskan environment. There are few visitors here except for the plethora of wildlife. Tangle Lakes offers amazing fishing. The most common fish caught here are Arctic Grayling, but there is good Lake Trout fishing early in the season (and sometimes later). The Grayling fishery has been listed in several places as the greatest in the world. For best access to the Grayling, it is usually best to take the rapids (portaging around the falls) and find the remote river areas that are much less frequented. The portage is two fairly challenging quarter-mile sections separated by a beaver pond, so when packing, remember that all gear will be carried half a mile. The rapids after the portage are Class II to II .

 

July 27-29 Gulkana $400

The Gulkana trip begins at Paxson Lake. There's a three-mile paddle through the lake before you get into the river, which maintains a fairly swift pace once you get into it. The Gulkana sees a fairly high usage by rafters, who find its class III whitewaters to be some of the more exciting in the Interior. Due to the high number of users, it is likely you will encounter other paddlers, although Alaskan paddlers tend to be very polite and friendly. Paxson Lake is known for its lake trout. The river is known for its salmon, but it also has grayling, Dolly Varden, and rainbow trout. The further down you get on the Gulkana, the more likely it is you'll see some Steelhead trout as well. The Gulkana trip has amazing scenery, a salmon counting station, and awesome rock formations as we travel through volcanic mountain ranges

 

August 9-12 Level 2 Essentials of River Canoeing course in conjunction with Tangle Lakes (prerequisite Level 1 course) $500

Course Overview: The Essentials of River Canoeing course is designed as an introduction to paddling rivers. Participants learn to catch large eddies and perform simple peel outs and ferries, recognize and avoid hazards, perform rescues and respond to emergencies on moving water rivers. This course is appropriate for all types of tandem and/or solo canoes. It can be taught tandem, solo, or both.                                                                         Tangle Lakes is the headwaters for the Delta River. The lower and upper lakes are connected by the Tangle River. This is a truly amazing 35-mile trip that takes you into the heart of the calm-but-wild Alaskan environment. There are few visitors here except for the plethora of wildlife. Tangle Lakes offers amazing fishing. The most common fish caught here are Arctic Grayling, but there is good Lake Trout fishing early in the season (and sometimes later). The Grayling fishery has been listed in several places as the greatest in the world. For best access to the Grayling, it is usually best to take the rapids (portaging around the falls) and find the remote river areas that are much less frequented. The portage is two fairly challenging quarter-mile sections separated by a beaver pond, so when packing, remember that all gear will be carried half a mile. The rapids after the portage are Class II to II .

 

August 17-19 Walker Fork and 40 Mile River $550

A major tributary of the Yukon River, the Fortymile is a clear water stream that has 6 main forks flowing east of the Mertie Mountains and north of the Tanana State Forest area, out of the Yukon-Tanana Uplands, not far south of the Arctic Circle. To the west of the Mertie Mountains is the Charley River and the mountain ridgeline is the boundary for the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve to the west. Both the Charley and the Fortymile are in the federal Wild and Scenic Rivers category and run clear and warm with Class I to IV rapids.The Fortymile is especially noted for its twisting and tortuous route through the rugged mountain forest landscape that can be really difficult to keep track of on a map

 

August 24-26 Rock Creek creeking (possibly Nenana River play) $100/day and $100 Transportation if desired

Rock Creek is a class II whitewater creek flowing into the upper Tangle Lakes area. This is a creeking day that can include several runs down this 3 mile rough and tumble section of creek. This trip is all about the whitewater and play. Add $100 for transportation to and from the creek if you don't want to just meet us there. You must have some kayak skill to participate in this adventure. This is a good introduction to the world of whitewater creeking.

 

August 31- September 2 Gulkana $400

The Gulkana trip begins at Paxson Lake. There's a three-mile paddle through the lake before you get into the river, which maintains a fairly swift pace once you get into it. The Gulkana sees a fairly high usage by rafters, who find its class III whitewaters to be some of the more exciting in the Interior. Due to the high number of users, it is likely you will encounter other paddlers, although Alaskan paddlers tend to be very polite and friendly. Paxson Lake is known for its lake trout. The river is known for its salmon, but it also has grayling, Dolly Varden, and rainbow trout. The further down you get on the Gulkana, the more likely it is you'll see some Steelhead trout as well. The Gulkana trip has amazing scenery, a salmon counting station, and awesome rock formations as we travel through volcanic mountain ranges

 

September 7-9 Rock Creek creeking $100/day and $100 Transportation if desired

Rock Creek is a class II whitewater creek flowing into the upper Tangle Lakes area. This is a creeking day that can include several runs down this 3 mile rough and tumble section of creek. This trip is all about the whitewater and play. Add $100 for transportation to and from the creek if you don't want to just meet us there. You must have some kayak skill to participate in this adventure. This is a good introduction to the world of whitewater creeking.

 

September 14-16 Tangle Lakes $350 Tangle Lakes is the headwaters for the Delta River. The lower and upper lakes are connected by the Tangle River. This is a truly amazing 35-mile trip that takes you into the heart of the calm-but-wild Alaskan environment. There are few visitors here except for the plethora of wildlife. Tangle Lakes offers amazing fishing. The most common fish caught here are Arctic Grayling, but there is good Lake Trout fishing early in the season (and sometimes later). The Grayling fishery has been listed in several places as the greatest in the world. For best access to the Grayling, it is usually best to take the rapids (portaging around the falls) and find the remote river areas that are much less frequented. The portage is two fairly challenging quarter-mile sections separated by a beaver pond, so when packing, remember that all gear will be carried half a mile. The rapids after the portage are Class II to II .

 

Trip Ratings

 Below are some of our trips, listed in order of popularity. Rankings in several categories are on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest. In the "Difficulty" category, a 5 indicates the most difficult that our guides will currently take customers on, not the class of whitewater. The "Remoteness" category indicates chances of seeing other people (1 meaning there will be other people around, 5 meaning there's nobody else for miles). A higher Remoteness score generally increases the likelihood of seeing more wildlife. 

 Trip Name 

Length

 Difficulty 

 Fishing 

 Scenery 

 Remoteness 

 Cost 

 Notes 

Tangle Lakes 26 mi, 3 days 2 5 5 4 $350 Challenging portage, incredible fishing and fossils
Gulkana River 39 mi, 3-4 days 4 3 5 4 $400 Portage, regular salmon runs
Rock Creek ~3 mi (repeated runs), 1 day 5 1* 3 2 $125-400* Creeking run, skill required
Chena River 1 day, variable length 1 1 1** 1 $75 No significant travel time; river runs through downtown Fairbanks
Upper Chena River 1-3 day, variable length 2 3 3 2 varies Near Chena Hot Springs!
Jim River ~16 mi, 2 days 2 4 5 4 $350 North of the Arctic Circle
Upper Chatanika ~30 mi, 2 days 2 2 2 2 $225 Old mining equipment
Mid Chatanika 8 hrs paddling 2 2 2 2 varies Can be run in one day or a casual overnight trip
Lower Chatanika 4 days 1 3 3 3  $550 Difficult takeout drive
Birch Creek 110 mi, 5-7 days 3 2 4 5 $550  
40 Mile 3 days 2 1 3 3 $450 May encounter dredging operations
40 Mile w/ Walker Fork 3 days 4 1 4 3 $550 Multiple drops of note
Hungry Hollow ~45 mi, 5-6 days 5 4 5 5 $550 Only runnable in high water

 

*There is a lake at the end of the creeking section of Rock Creek, so fishing is an option, but it isn't the focus of this trip

**The scenery for Chena River is ranked a 1 because the river goes through downtown, which most of our guides don't consider majestic. However, this category is fairly subjective, and if urban scenery is your preference, then you can bump this number up to probably a 4. There are many interesting and beautiful things to see on this trip, and much our guides can teach about Fairbanks history.